Kate Moss And Bella Hadid Borrow From The Boys At Dior Pre-Fall 2019 Show

The models joined a starry front row in Tokyo

Kate Moss and Bella Hadid

Photo: Getty

Bella Hadid and Kate Moss demonstrated the art of borrowing from the boys at Kim Jones’ debut pre-fall cruise show for Dior yesterday.

The supermodels were among the first to wear looks before they even graced the runway – giving their own sartorial spin on ‘Dior 2.0’.

In a rare opportunity to watch from the sidelines, Hadid wore the first look of the collection – a sports luxe turtleneck lengthened in order for her to wear it as a mini dress.

Related article: Watch The Dior Men Pre-Fall 2019 Runway Show Live From Tokyo!

Bella Hadid

Bella Hadid wore the first look of the collection as an oversized dress with trainers.
Photo: Getty

To give the ensemble street style-worthy status, the 22-year-old threw on Mathew Williams accessories and donned chunky ‘dad’ trainers.

Meanwhile, front row regular Kate Moss gave a glimpse of her winter-ready wardrobe in an oversized houndstooth trench and co-ordinating trousers with nothing but a sheer shirt to finish.

Kate Moss

Kate Moss wore an oversized checked trench and co-ordinating trousers to the Tokyo show.
Photo: Getty

But the A-list duo weren’t the only industry names to make the starry guest list with David Beckham, ASAP Rocky and Ezra Miller also taking to the FROW.

After gracing the headlines at a football match together back in March, Hadid and Beckham had chance to catch up at the menswear event.

Related article: Bella Hadid Is On A ‘Naked Dress’ Streak With Her Street Style Looks

Bella Hadid and David Beckham

Photo: Getty

The show marked the first Dior men’s cruise collection and newly-appointed Kim Jones chose the capital to pay homage to Japanese culture.

Models took to the laser-lit runway decked in sci fi-inspired uniform with ultra-modern tailoring, cherry blossom-emblazoned suits and iridescent puffer jackets featuring in the line-up.

Half-slung metal saddle bags and a robot-sprawled interpretation of Dior’s logo also helped to create the “hypermodern reality of Japanese culture today”.

To really push this vision, Jones also enlisted the help of Japanese illustrator and sculptor Hajime Sorayama to create a 12-metre-high female robot figure which stood tall in the centre of the catwalk.

Related article: Natalie Portman’s Ballet-Inspired Dior Couture Gown Took 250 Hours To Make

Despite the futuristic feel, it’s interesting to note that Jones flicked through the depths of the brand’s archives for inspiration – sighting Christian Dior’s historic influence.

He told WWD, “We have references to Japanese design, we have some kimono styles in the collection, but they were designed by Mr. Dior in the 1950s.”

“I think it’s respecting where you’re showing, and I don’t think it’s a negative. I think if you love somewhere, celebrate it.”

This article originally appeared on Harper’s Bazaar UK.

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