NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SINGAPORE ART
What is not visible is not invisible, 2008. Julien Discrit. Photo: Courtesy of the National Museum of Singapore

The National Museum of Singapore’s new exhibition, What Is Not Visible Is Not Invisible brings to Singapore for the first time artworks from the French Regional Collections of Contemporary Art (FRAC). Presenting Singaporeans with the opportunity to experience iconic and experimental new works by critically acclaimed international artists, here are five highlights from the exhibition:

1. You and I, Horizontal (2005) by Anthony McCall.

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SINGAPORE ART
Photo: Courtesy of the National Museum of Singapore

This “solid light” installation by the Britain-born pioneer of experimental film and installation art in the 1970s reflects his belief that light is not simply what is seen, but a body of experience.

2. Work n°262, Half the Air in a Given Space (2001) by Martin Creed.

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SINGAPORE ART
Photo: Courtesy of the National Museum of Singapore

Perhaps the most iconic work by the British multimedia artist, this playful piece elegantly challenges the definition of art in Creed’s trademark aesthetic simplicity.

3. Blue Sail (1965) by Hans Haacke.

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SINGAPORE ART
Photo: Courtesy of the National Museum of Singapore

German artist Haacke is one of the most influential conceptual and installation artists of the 20th century. This poetic early work confounds conventional sculpture and exposes the interrelationship between man, nature, and perception.

4. Déjà Vu (Hallu) (2003) by Michel François.

Déjà Vu (Hallu) is a mesmerizing video work by the French conceptual artist. With a deft play of hands, a sheet of aluminum is transformed into a hypnotic sequence of figures and faces.

5. Les oiseaux de Céleste (2008) by Céleste Boursier-Mougenot and Ariane Michel.

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SINGAPORE ART
Photo: Courtesy of the National Museum of Singapore

A beguiling sonic composition featuring a flock of songbirds “performing” on electric guitars. Inspired by Boursier-Mougenot’s training as a musician and composer, it draws upon the rhythms of daily life to present an organic approach to sound production.

By Rachel Ng